Alaska and New Mexico Lead in Vaccinations, Utah is Dead Last

Mish

Alaska is administering vaccines at nearly twice the pace of Utah on a percentage of population basis.

Tracking Covid-19 Vaccine Distribution

The WSJ has an interesting article on Vaccine Distribution Tracking

66.5 Million Doses Administered

66.5M doses have been administered out of the 88.7M doses distributed.

Leading States 

  • Alaska: 21.3%
  • South Dakota: 18.4%
  • Connecticut: 17.3% 
  • North Dakota: 17.1%

Lagging states

  • Utah: 11.4%
  • Tennessee: 11.5%
  • Georgia: 11.5%
  • Texas: 11.6%

Vaccinations are not Red vs Blue state, nor Big vs Small state so it's difficult to say why some states are much better than others. 

Israel leads the world with 36.4% of the population fully vaccinated and 52.4% receiving one dose.

G7 Countries - Fully and Partially

  • UK: 0.9% and 26.4%
  • US: 5.9% and 13.3%
  • Germany 2.2% and 4.2%
  • Italy: 2.2% and 3.9%
  • France: 1.8% and 3.8%
  • Canada: 0.8% and 2.6%
  • Japan: 0.0% and 0.0%

The US is doing far better than the EU. The UK strategy is clearly to get the most people vaccinated as soon as possible rather than attempting to go for both shots.

Mish

Comments (27)
No. 1-21
frozeninthenorth
frozeninthenorth

Didn't the Dakotas have the higher covid rate (per million)? The stats seem to show that North Dakota's rate of Covid was 130,000 per million (40% higher than the US average).

I guess that it relates to better public health official that were able to get the system working fast and efficiently -- nothing to do with politics and everything to do with sheer human competence...it happens sometimes

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

I think we started off well in Texas, but then we hit a snag...not sure if it had to do with decisions to get more doses out to rural areas or what....but we have some employees who got the first dose and have now been put off for weeks on dose two.

The so-called Phasing Plan is....no plan, other than what they’re calling 1A and 1B...and 1A is very poorly described as “front line healthcare workers”...and the state hasn’t bothered with even clarifying whether that should include dentists, which it surely should.

They (whoever they are, presumably the governor) have not said who will be in groups 1C, 2, or 3.

I feel lucky to have gotten mine early, before the current bottleneck.

Zardoz
Zardoz

Surprised so many are taking it in Alaska... they have a very high population of Trump's Chumps and antivax nut jobs.

Doug78
Doug78

"The US is doing far better than the EU." It boils down to the EU's response being bureaucratic driven vs the US's response being elected-representative driven.

Rbm
Rbm

Larger population equals more ( moving parts) so to speak. Things move slower. What happened to west va. They were off to a good start.

quanticus
quanticus

We have a COMPETENT, DEMOCRATIC Governor...Ms. Michelle Lujan Grisham. Not sure about Alaska or other states though.

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

Utah has 3.2 million people and 58 public healthcare clinics.

Alaska has something like 169 clinics for just 731 thousand . It might to have a lot to do with the existing infrastructure, much of which looks to have been set up to provide for the Native American tribes.

That’s just a guess.

Sechel
Sechel

Germany allowe the EU to negotiate vaccines on its behalf. It wasn't first in line. The country is reeping the results

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

OT....reading more in Daylight Robbery on a slow day at work....I am just amazed at how well Dominic Frisby gets the real history of the US Civil War. He gets high marks from me for his scholarship.

I’m anxious to see what he says about the future of taxation now....I wonder if he agrees with me on how sovereign cryptos will be used to collect more tax. I’m tempted to read ahead to find out.....lol.

Sechel
Sechel

The successes seem to have a common attribute. Israel has a national medical system and look at what contributed to Alasa and South Dakota's success

Contributing to Alaska's quick speed in getting the vaccine to its residents is a federal partnership that allows the state, which has more than 200 indigenous tribes, to receive additional vaccines to distribute through the Indian Health Service

South Dakota has a very centralized health system

KURRA: Yes, that's correct. It's quite remarkable. I'd say the key factors here are we're the only health system for western South Dakota. And since the state was giving the entire allotment for the western half to us at Monumental Health, we then had from one place to dispense that and message it out and make sure people got it. So centralized distribution helped to get those numbers out. And actually, we get about roughly 3,000 vaccines a week, and by the end of the week, we have given 100%. Actually, last week we gave 102% because that extra 2% is that additional sixth dose that we got out of some of those...

davebarnes2
davebarnes2

Utah is surprising to me given how one church controls so much of the state.

Sechel
Sechel

sounds like the wsj failed to dig into the disparities. I pointed out a few. but drilling down to why some states are doing well while others are not would be the logical next step. Israel is well documented. small country, national medical system, everyone belongs to the army, lots of ways to quickly and efficiently get dosage in. Alaska partnered with the Federal government and South Dakota has one provider dealing with half the state. seems the successes have a commonality. As far as Germany , the failure is letting the EU negotiate on their behalf.

Doug78
Doug78

The EU negotiated with the Pharma companies as a whole. The reasoning was first of all that each country would be allocated the vaccines in proportion to their populations and secondly by negotiating as a block of 500 or so million the EU would get better terms. That was the theory and the expectation. The problems started with choosing who would do the negotiations and by default it fell on the part of the EU Commission which negotiates trade deals. The EU fell behind in the beginning because it took time for the states to negotiate among themselves as to who would negotiate for the EU. Then there were differing conceptions as to what they were negotiating for. The EU negotiating team was headed by someone who had no experience in the Pharma industry and there was confusion in their mission statement. Consequently the negotiating team negotiated with the Pharma companies on price above all. They did get a great price but they sacrificed speed of delivery. Other issues came into the equation too. For example the EU refused to give the companies a liability waver which by the way is generally granted in past epidemics. Another example is that they would pay only if the vaccine worked and that if it didn't then all loans would have to be reimbursed. There are other issues that in hindsight seem incredibly stupid. The CEO of Moderna is French and left Europe to start the company many years ago and he explained the problems with the EU compared to the US. First of all the US's quick reaction came from the realization early on by all parties that this was a true emergency and that all expenses and efforts had to be made. Congress voted the money and fortunately we have very good public officials who were able to interface with the Pharma companies to eliminate bottlenecks and basically get things done. We are talking about the vaccines and not the lockdowns and so forth. The head of Moderna offered to the EU his company RNA vaccines early one. The EU took two months to answer and another two to make the contract. For the US he had a contract signed in one week, all the money needed to build facilities and hire people, a liability waver and logistical help for whatever his company needed. They said just get the vaccine done. The EU lost four months and by the time that the big member states realized that it was going so badly it was too late. The oversight was weak and the will wasn't there. Compared to what the US put in the EU put in pennies. A total fiasco.

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

Our employees who have been on hold for the second shot are getting texts today telling them they can get them now...I only have one employee left who hasn’t gotten the first dose.....hopefully we can get her hooked up too.

We are nothing like “normal” in our business...and unlikely to get back to normal anytime soon. The county COVID dashboard here in the burbs where my office is......hasn’t had the numbers updated since the 11th of the month....looks like they let the freeze last week get in the way of reporting the cases...

mattreedah
mattreedah

This is an absolutely bad article and is asking really bad questions. Look to Utah's amount of DISTRIBUTED vaccines vs. their allotment. It has been in the top 5 consistently. Utah has the largest amount of children in the country per capita; thus, they aren't being sent the same amount of vaccines by the federal government. They do not control this allotment -- it is the federal government. Again, such a bad article.

Realist
Realist

While I understand that many people in various US states want to be vaccinated as quickly as possible in order to get their state back towards "normal", the reality is that this is a global pandemic. Until we can vaccinate enough people worldwide, the pandemic will continue to slow our return to "normal". And since it appears as though the pandemic will become endemic, "normal" is likely going to include vaccine boosters (whether annual, biannual, etc), masks, social distancing, etc. Another example of a new normal.

PostCambrian
PostCambrian

Actually looks more like small (population) states are leading large (population) states although all the laggards are red states. But you don't know if some states have been given a higher per capita portion of vaccines or some other explanation. I wouldn't read too much into it right now.

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

The dollar made a strong move up last night. Gold is basically sitting on 3rd support and will either bounce here or probably break down to much lower levels (jmho).

My expectation is that the dollar eases into the close and gold bounces. I might try to reset my GLD trade, which I got stopped out of immediately yesterday.

I fully expect the boys on the PPT to work their magic today to keep stocks from correcting....if they don’t it looks better than 50/50 odds we see at least a modest correction...what I’d describe as topping behavior....not a real crash....yet.

We’re about to find out what tools the Fed still has in their toolbox. I tend to give them more credit for having tools than some others do....lol.

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

Gold broke down....looks to be trying to regroup at the 1720 level...if that doesn’t hold it could break 1700...

I’m in on GLD at 161.50.....with my finger on the trigger. lol.

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

Took my tiny profit and stepped out. I don’t want to be long at the open on Monday the way the dollar is behaving today. Too much uncertainty.

My online broker is trying to cut me off for imitating a day trader....my balance is too low for all my trading this week.....not sure why broke day-traders who don’t even use margin are a threat. lol.


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