Flippy, a burger-flipping robot, has begun work at a restaurant in Pasadena, Los Angeles. It is the first of dozens of locations for the system, which is destined to replace human fast-food workers.

Flippy is being installed in 50 locations.

Each flippy costs $60,000 and costs $12,000 a year to operate. One Flippy can cook 12 burgers. A worker making $15 an hour, 40 hours a week, working 50 weeks a year would cost $31,200 plus benefits (assuming 2 weeks paid vacation).

But Flippy can work two shifts and it never gets sick. For it to be employed in 50 locations, someone must think Flippy is worth it.

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