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As of Friday morning, a foot of rain has already hit many areas. The storm is expected to linger for a week bringing record rainfall, as much as 40 inches in some areas, on already saturated ground.

North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Maryland, and the D.C. all issued states of of emergency.

Weather.Com reports Hurricane Florence Has Made Landfall Near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina; Catastrophic Flash Flooding to Hammer the Carolinas, Appalachia.

Key Points

  • Florence is expected to crawl near or along the coast of the Carolinas through Friday.
  • The eyewall is onshore in southeastern North Carolina and is only the beginning of what could be a record-wet siege from a tropical cyclone in parts of the Tar Heel State.
  • Extreme rainfall is already occurring in eastern North Carolina. A flash flood emergency was issued for portions of Carteret, Craven, Pamlico and Jones counties due to a combination of storm surge and heavy rainfall. This flash flood emergency includes New Bernand Morehead City.
  • Life-threatening storm surge is occurring in eastern North Carolina. Hurricane-force winds are occurring in eastern North Carolina.
  • Friday morning, Wilmington, North Carolina, recorded a wind gust to 105 mph, the second strongest wind on record here. A wind gust to 100 mph was reported at Cape Fear, North Carolina earlier Friday and a buoy about 50 miles to the east of the center of Florence's eye recently reported a wind gust to 112 mph.
  • Coastal North Carolina into far northeastern South Carolina expects an additional 20 to 25 inches, with isolated totals up to 40 inches. The rest of South Carolina and North Carolina into southwestern Virginia expect 5 to 10 inches, with isolated totals up to 15 inches.

Peak Winds

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Current Winds

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Expected Rainfall

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Hundreds of Thousands Without Power

Florence leaves Hundreds of Thousands Without Power in North Carolina

As of 7:30 a.m., Friday, 372,095 people were without power.

Best wishes to those impacted.

Mike "Mish" Shedlock